Sweepting Changes for the SEC and CFTC

17 06 2009

The White House today released a “white paper” outlining their plans for reform for the regulation of financial markets.  Two major changes will greatly affect the world of Securities Markets.  The first deals with Hedge Fund filings with the SEC.  From the Wall Street Journal.

Hedge funds and other private pools of capital would have to register with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Thousands of financial institutions would be required to hold more capital in reserve to protect against unexpected losses, and companies would also have to retain a portion of the credit risk for loans they have packaged into securities.

It seems that the main target of this regulation is not the hedge funds themselves, but Ponzi schemes.  The registration and reserve requirements will have the affect of allowing the SEC to monitor investments closely.  Ponzi schemes by their nature lack reserves because they are structured based on continuing investment and payouts to where their capitol is always less than what was invested.  This will raise large red flags for the SEC which has been criticized for their inability to spot Ponzi schemes.

The second major change involves an increase of police powers by both the SEC and the CFTCWall Street Journal:

The Securities and Exchange Commission and Commodity Futures Trading Commission should get “clear, unimpeded authority to police and prevent fraud” in the derivatives markets, according to a new Obama administration proposal….

“All OTC derivatives markets, including CDS (credit default swaps) markets, should be subject to comprehensive regulation that addresses relevant public policy objectives,” according to a near-final draft of the regulator plan….

The plan calls for amending commodities and securities laws “to authorize the CFTC and the SEC, consistent with their respective missions, to impose recordkeeping and reporting requirements (including an audit trail) on all OTC derivatives.”

In their conception, the SEC and the SFTC were not designed as policing bodies, but as regulatory institutions.  It will be interesting to see how they make the shift.   It would involve a major shift in the role played by both bodies.  There may even be some constitutional questions regarding federal policing powers.  Congress, and more importantly, the public ought to take a hard look at the Obama plan and scrutinize the proposed changes.

The white paper has been made available by the Wall Street Journal.  You can access it here.

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